Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

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Main things affecting your body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather:

  • High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won't evaporate as quickly, which keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
  • Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.

People at greatest risk for heat-related illness can take the following protective actions to prevent illness or death:

  • People who are at highest risk are the elderly, the very young, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness.
  • Even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather.
  • Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death. If a home is not air-conditioned, people can reduce their risk for heat-related illness by spending time in public facilities that are air-conditioned.
  • Stay in an air-conditioned indoor location as much as possible.
  • Drink plenty of fluids even if you don't feel thirsty.
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully.
    • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen.
    • Pace yourself.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Do not leave children or pets in cars.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates.
Source: CDC

The Truth About Tanning

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Your natural skin color is great the way it is! Every time you tan, you increase your risk of melanoma.

Myth: I have to get a tan to look good.
Truth: You should know your skin will pay a price! Fine lines and wrinkles, cataracts, sagging skin, and brown spots.

Myth: Only old people get cancer.
Truth: Young women are getting skin cancer more often. The risk is real! Melanoma—the deadliest kind—is the third most common cancer in people from 15 to 39. You can get melanoma in your eyes.

Myth: Having a good base tan will protect my skin from the sun.
Truth: A tan is a sign of damaged skin.

Myth: Tanning beds are a good way to get vitamin D.
Truth: Tanning beds are risky, and most people get enough vitamin D from food and sunlight during daily activities.

You can get more than a tan from a tanning bed! If the tanning bed isn't clean, you could pick up a serious skin infection with symptoms like genital warts, skin rashes, skin warts, and flaky discolored patches on your skin.

Source: CDC

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